NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
loading...

Luc Renneboog

Tilburg University
PO Box 90153
5000 LE Tilburg
the Netherlands

E-Mail: Luc.Renneboog@uvt.nl
Institutional Affiliation: Tilburg University

NBER Working Papers and Publications

March 2020When a Master Dies: Speculation and Asset Float
with Julien Pénasse, José A. Scheinkman: w26831
The death of an artist constitutes a negative supply shock to his future production; in finance terms, this supply shock reduces the artist's float. Intuition may thus suggest that this supply shock reduces the future auction volume of the artist. However, if collectors have fluctuating heterogeneous beliefs, since they cannot sell short, prices overweigh optimists' beliefs and have a speculative component. If collectors have limited capacity to bear risk, an increase in float may decrease subsequent turnover and prices (Hong et al. 2006). Symmetrically, a negative supply shock leads to an augmentation of prices and turnover. We find strong support for this prediction in the data on art auctions that we examine.
November 2009Art and Money
with William N. Goetzmann, Christophe Spaenjers: w15502
This paper investigates the impact of equity markets and top incomes on art prices. Using a long-term art market index that incorporates information on repeated sales since the eighteenth century, we demonstrate that both same-year and lagged equity market returns have a significant impact on the price level in the art market. Over a shorter time frame, we also find empirical evidence that an increase in income inequality may lead to higher prices for art, in line with the results of a numerical simulation analysis. Finally, the results of Johansen cointegration tests strongly suggest the existence of a long-term relation between top incomes and art prices.

Published: William N. Goetzmann & Luc Renneboog & Christophe Spaenjers, 2011. "Art and Money," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(3), pages 222-26, May. citation courtesy of

 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Themes
Data
People
About

National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us