NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Diane E. Alexander

Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
11th floor
230 S. LaSalle St.
Chicago, IL 60604

E-Mail: EmailAddress: hidden: you can email any NBER-related person as first underscore last at nber dot org

NBER Working Papers and Publications

July 2017Is It Who You Are or Where You Live? Residential Segregation and Racial Gaps in Childhood Asthma
with Janet Currie: w23622
Higher asthma rates are one of the more obvious ways that health inequalities between African American and other children are manifested beginning in early childhood. In 2010, black asthma rates were double non-black rates. Some but not all of this difference can be explained by factors such as a higher incidence of low birth weight (LBW) among blacks; however, even conditional on LBW, blacks have a higher incidence of asthma than others. Using a unique data set based on the health records of all children born in New Jersey between 2006 and 2010, we show that when we split the data by whether or not children live in a “black” zip code, this racial difference in the incidence of asthma among LBW children entirely disappears. All LBW children in these zip codes, regardless of race, have a hi...

Published: Diane Alexander & Janet Currie, 2017. "Is it who you are or where you live? Residential segregation and racial gaps in childhood asthma," Journal of Health Economics, . citation courtesy of

Check Up Before You Check Out: Retail Clinics and Emergency Room Use
with Janet Currie, Molly Schnell: w23585
Policies such as liberalizing scope-of-practice rules about nurse practitioners have helped to fuel the rise of retail clinics nationwide. Given concern about inefficient use of the ER increasing health care costs, we use all emergency room (ER) visits in New Jersey from 2006-2014 to examine the impact of retail clinics on ER usage. We find that people residing close to an open clinic are 4.1-12.3 percent less likely to use an ER for preventable conditions and minor acute conditions. Our estimates suggest an annual cost savings of over $70 million from reduced ER usage if retail clinics were readily available across New Jersey.
August 2016Are Publicly Insured Children Less Likely to be Admitted to Hospital than the Privately Insured (and Does it Matter)?
with Janet Currie: w22542
There is continuing controversy about the extent to which publicly insured children are treated differently than privately insured children, and whether differences in treatment matter. We show that on average, hospitals are less likely to admit publicly insured children than privately insured children who present at the ER and the gap grows during high flu weeks, when hospital beds are in high demand. This pattern is present even after controlling for detailed diagnostic categories and hospital fixed effects, but does not appear to have any effect on measurable health outcomes such as repeat ER visits and future hospitalizations. Hence, our results raise the possibility that instead of too few publicly insured children being admitted during high flu weeks, there are too many publicly a...

Published: Diane Alexander & Janet Currie, 2017. "Are publicly insured children less likely to be admitted to hospital than the privately insured (and does it matter)?," Economics & Human Biology, vol 25, pages 33-51.

 
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