NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
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Alexander M. Chinco

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
1206 S 6th St, Rm 343J
Champaign, IL 61820

E-Mail: EmailAddress: hidden: you can email any NBER-related person as first underscore last at nber dot org
Institutional Affiliation: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

NBER Working Papers and Publications

October 2017Sparse Signals in the Cross-Section of Returns
with Adam D. Clark-Joseph, Mao Ye: w23933
This paper applies the Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO) to make rolling 1-minute-ahead return forecasts using the entire cross section of lagged returns as candidate predictors. The LASSO increases both out-of-sample fit and forecast-implied Sharpe ratios. And, this out-of-sample success comes from identifying predictors that are unexpected, short-lived, and sparse. Although the LASSO uses a statistical rule rather than economic intuition to identify predictors, the predictors it identifies are nevertheless associated with economically meaningful events: the LASSO tends to identify as predictors stocks with news about fundamentals.

Published: ALEX CHINCO & ADAM D. CLARK-JOSEPH & MAO YE, 2019. "Sparse Signals in the Cross-Section of Returns," The Journal of Finance, vol 74(1), pages 449-492.

August 2017Investment-Horizon Spillovers
with Mao Ye: w23650
This paper uses wavelets to decompose each stock’s trading-volume variance into frequency-specific components. We find that stocks dominated by short-run fluctuations in trading volume have abnormal returns that are 1% per month higher than otherwise similar stocks where short-run fluctuations in volume are less important—i.e., stocks with less of a short-run tilt. And, we document that a stock’s short-run tilt can change rapidly from month to month, suggesting that these abnormal returns are not due to some persistent firm characteristic that’s simultaneously adding both short-run fluctuations and long-term risk.
January 2014Misinformed Speculators and Mispricing in the Housing Market
with Christopher Mayer: w19817
This paper uses transactions-level deeds records to examine how out-of-town second house buyers contributed to mispricing in the housing market. We document that out-of-town second house buyers behaved like misinformed speculators and drove up both house price and implied-to-actual rent ratio (IAR) appreciation rates in cities like Phoenix, Las Vegas, and Miami in the mid 2000s. Our analysis has 3 parts. First, we give evidence that out-of-town second house buyers behaved like misinformed speculators. Compared to local second house buyers, out- of-town second house buyers had worse exit timing (i.e., were likely misinformed) and were also less able to consume the dividend from their purchase (i.e., were likely speculators). Second, we show that increases in out-of-town second house buyer d...

Published: Alex Chinco & Christopher Mayer, 2016. "Misinformed Speculators and Mispricing in the Housing Market," Review of Financial Studies, vol 29(2), pages 486-522. citation courtesy of

 
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